Live Education Sessions

If you are registered for the Full Annual Meeting, you have access to attend any of the sessions below. Click the title to expand a preview and mark your favorties, if you wish. You can click the "Watch Session" button at any time in advance to reach the session's page and preview session materials or add a session to your calendar. It is here where you'll also see the first component on the Contents tab, which is where you will enter the live session.

ABOUT TIME ZONES

This event platform will automatically convert session start times to your local time zone, based on the location from where you are located when you log in. The Agenda listings and dated session components will be converted automatically to your local time zone.

ABOUT RECORDINGS

All sessions will be recorded so that you can watch the ones you've missed later. Recordings will be available on the session's page by June 25. Recordings will remain available for viewing until June 1, 2022. If you are looking to earn CE credit, note that a session may have different credit approved for attending live versus viewing it on-demand, even for the same credit type.

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Tue, Jun 8 at 11:15 am EDT
SP01. Keynote Address: My Journey to Discover Why Health Disparities Exist

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Overview

Thomas LaVeist, PhD is dean of the Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He has an extensive record of publication in scientific journals as well as numerous mass media outlets, and is director and executive producer of “The Skin You’re In,” documentary series about racial inequalities in health. He is also author of six books including “Minority Population and Health: An Introduction to Health Disparities in the United States” (the first text book on health disparities). An award winning research scientist, Dr. LaVeist has received the “Innovation Award” from National Institutes of Health, the “Knowledge Award” from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. 

In his keynote address, Dr. LaVeist will explain ways in which social determinants of health produce race disparities in health and explain flaws in research methods commonly used to study health disparities.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation UnitedHealthcare Student Resources Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss the three most common myths about the explanations for racial disparities in health.
  2. Explain flaws in research methods commonly used to study health disparities.
  3. Explain ways in which social determinants of health produce race disparities in health.
Presenter(s)

Thomas LaVeist, PhD (Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine)

Moderator

Scott Tims, PhD (Tulane University)

Speakers

Thomas LaVeist, PhD,

Tue, Jun 8 at 12:45 pm EDT
A1. Implementing a Streamlined LARC Program and Managing Common Side Effects and Complications

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Overview

The implant and IUDs are the most effective methods, yet usage rates remain low. We will present LARC guideline updates, management of the most common side effects to decrease barriers and expand current university programs. In the era of COVID 19, providers want to minimize visits to clinics to decrease risk of exposure. We will present our web-based consultation program which reduced access barriers and allowed program continuation with little alteration to workflow and operations.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Professional Nursing Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss how a web-based LARC consultation service improved LARC access and reduced appointment barriers, while reducing the need for in-person, phone, and telemedicine appointments to provide the same consultation service.
  2. Discuss implementation of a web-based LARC consultation program on their campus to improve LARC access.
  3. Describe the key advantages, disadvantages, and primary eligibility criteria of the LARC methods relevant to university students.
  4. Describe management of the most common side effects and complications of LARC methods.
Presenter(s)

Melanie Deal, MS, FNP-BC, WHNP-BC, and Eleanore Kim, MD (University of California, Berkeley)

Moderator

Emily Lenz, MSN, FNP-BC (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Speakers

Melanie Deal, MS, FNP-BC, WHNP-BC, Nurse Practitioner Supervisor

Eleanore Kim, MD, Physician

Tue, Jun 8 at 12:45 pm EDT
A2. An Intradepartmental Research-Practice Partnership

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Overview

This program examines University of Florida's Student Health Care Center's Research Office, which is responsible for the development, conduct, analysis, and dissemination of research relevant to collegiate health. We'll discuss the benefit of internally-developed applied research, increased student engagement, stronger continuing education for clinicians, data-informed policies/practices, and accreditation support. We will also cover the associated logistics, funding, training, partnerships, and the roles of students (the Collegiate Health Research Internship).

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Josh Kaplan Fund for Clinical Medicine.

Learning Objectives
  1. Explain the benefits of an intradepartmental research-practice partnership in student health.
  2. Compare different funding opportunities for a student health research office.
  3. Discuss how to build a diverse, innovative, interdisciplinary research team.
  4. Describe the potential roles of student researchers in the field of collegiate health.
Presenter(s)

Kelli Agrawal, MPH, TTS, Casey Rayfield, and Ronald Berry, MD (University of Florida)

Moderator

Catherine Healy-Sharbaugh, DNP,FNP (The College Mount Saint Vincent)

Speakers

Kelli Agrawal, MPH, TTS, Research Project Specialist

Casey Rayfield, Research Assistant

Ronald Berry, MD, Director

Tue, Jun 8 at 12:45 pm EDT
A3. The Role of Pharmacy Benefits Managers (PBMs) in the Delivery of Pharmacy Services

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Overview

Pharmacy Benefits Managers (PBMs) play a central role in the delivery of pharmacy services as nearly 9 in 10 prescriptions are paid for, at least in part, by PBMs. The role of PBMs has evolved over time. Their opaque reimbursement practices have posed serious financial challenges for pharmacies and caused many calls for increased regulation. How PBMs are regulated in the future will have lasting effects on the practice of pharmacy for years to come.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss the history and current role of pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs).
  2. Review current reimbursement trends for community-based pharmacy services.
  3. Describe the financial impacts of PBM practices on pharmacies, patients, the healthcare system, and the taxpayer.
  4. Identify measures currently being taken to regulate PBM practices.
  5. Identify strategies to mitigate PBM reimbursement reduction.
Presenter(s)

Justin Kirby, PharmD, BCACP, NBC-HWC (Lipscomb University)

Moderator

Ashlee Stone, PharmD (University of Connecticut)

Speakers

Justin Kirby, PharmD, BCACP, NBC-HWC, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice

Tue, Jun 8 at 12:45 pm EDT
A4. Developing and Implementing White Accountability and Learning Groups on Campus

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Overview

With the resurgence of racial unrest due to the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmed Arbury, and the many others who have died at the hands of white supremacy, there has been an increase in White Learning and Accountability Groups (WLAG) being started on campuses. This panel discussion will focus on how three campuses have launched these groups and the lessons they have learned as white folks who are doing this work.

Learning Objectives
  1. Define the purpose of white accountability groups on campus.
  2. Discuss the need for and two benefits of white accountability groups.
  3. Name two resources that can be used to develop white accountability groups.
Presenter(s)

Marian Trattner, MSW, CHWP, Mariane Magjuka, EdD, MeD (Wake Forest University); Joleen Nevers, MAEd, CHES, CSE, CSES (University of Connecticut); Megan Marks, PhD, MA, Ashley Hinton-Moncer, MPH, MS(University of Kentucky)

Moderator

Ashley Hinton, MPH, MS (University of Kentucky)

Speakers

Marian Trattner, MSW, CHWP, Interim Director

Marianne Magjuka, EdD, MEd, Assistant Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Office of Civic & Community Engagement

Joleen Nevers, MAEd, CHES, CSE, CSES, Program Director for Regional Wellness

Megan Marks, PhD, MA, Assistant Director for Outreach and Consultation

Ashley Hinton-Moncer, MPH, MS, Student Wellness Director

Tue, Jun 8 at 12:45 pm EDT
A5. Adopting the Healthy Campus Framework: Using the Inventory to Build Capacity

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Overview

An important tool of the new Healthy Campus Framework is the Healthy Campus Inventory. This environmental scan helps institutions of higher education to conduct an evaluation assessing their infrastructure and identify components needed to advance the health and wellbeing of their campus community. Participants will discuss the components of the new Healthy Campus Framework, describe the Healthy Campus Inventory, and identify ways to build capacity at their home institutions. Relevant resources will also be discussed.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Health Promotion in Higher Education Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss the components of the new Healthy Campus Framework.
  2. Describe the Healthy Campus Inventory.
  3. Identify ways to build capacity at their home institutions.
Presenter(s)

Monica Webb, PhD, MPH, CHES (University of Florida); Jordan Perry, MPH, CHES, CWWS (University of North Carolina Asheville)

Moderator

Cynthia Burwell, EdD. MCHES (Norfolk State University)

Speakers

Monica Webb, PhD, MPH, CHES, Director

Jordan Perry, Healthy Campus Liaison

Tue, Jun 8 at 12:45 pm EDT
A6. Kind Mind: Encouraging Self-Compassion

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Overview

Students are increasingly self-critical, which often is detrimental to positive well-being. Self-criticism is correlated with loneliness, depression, and anxiety, three current mental health concerns. Mindful self-compassion (MSC) is a useful intervention in managing self-criticism and improving health. MSC consists of kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness and positively influences well-being while decreasing the experience of stress and symptomology. This session will review a four-week workshop that teaches the skill of MSC and offers suggestions for implementation with students.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe the demands placed on students that cause self-criticism.
  2. Discuss the impact that self-criticism has on positive well-being.
  3. Discuss the definition of self-compassion and the benefits of practicing self-compassion.
  4. Describe ways to incorporate self-compassion into working with students and colleagues.
Presenter(s)

Becca Rampe, PsyD (University of North Carolina Wilmington)

Moderator

Katherine Cornelius, MSW, LCSW (Belmont University)

Speakers

Rebecca Rampe, PsyD, LP, HSP-P, Staff Psychologist-Outreach Coordinator

Tue, Jun 8 at 3:00 pm EDT
B1. The Ball's in Your Court: Addressing Men's Sexual Health Concerns in a College Health Setting

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Overview

Patients are often too shy to ask and providers frequently stumble over what to say. In this presentation, we will discuss male sexual dysfunction, testicular pain, dysuria/urethritis, and dermatologic manifestations of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs): how to treat them, and how to ask those personal questions and offer thoughtful responses.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Josh Kaplan Fund for Clinical Medicine.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss certain language that may discourage patient openness in discussing sexual health.
  2. List differential diagnoses for presenting male urogenital complaints.
  3. Describe current treatment recommendations for sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) and other male urogenital concerns.
  4. Describe possible sequelae from untreated infections or issues.
Presenter(s)

Benjamin Silverberg, MD, MSc, FAAFP, FCUCM (West Virginia University)

Moderator

Carmen Burrell, DO (West Virginia University)

Speakers

Benjamin Silverberg, MD, MSc, FAAFP, FCUCM, Assistant Professor, Medical Director

Tue, Jun 8 at 3:00 pm EDT
B2. A Mindfulness and Self-Compassion Program for Gender and Sexual Minority Emerging Adults: Lessons Learned

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Overview

Persistent mental health disparities in gender and sexual minority (GSM) emerging adults call for innovative, culturally sensitive interventions that mitigate the stress response and support wellbeing. Practicing mindfulness and self-compassion can potentially alleviate the detrimental effects of minority stress in this vulnerable population. This presentation will discuss lessons learned after implementing a mindfulness-based self-compassion program for GSM emerging adults in a college and community health setting, with a focus on recommendations for implementing future programs.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss the health disparities faced by gender and sexual minority (GSM) emerging adults.
  2. Define minority stress.
  3. Explain how learning mindfulness meditation and self-compassion skills might benefit GSM emerging adults.
  4. List 3 recommendations for future iterations of mindfulness programs for the GSM community.
Presenter(s)

Jennifer Ahlquist, MSN, RN, ANP-BC (Nursing Practice Corporation/Campus Health Center)

Moderator

Padma Entsuah, MPH (Columbia University)

Speakers

Jennifer Ahlquist, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, Nurse Practitioner

Tue, Jun 8 at 3:00 pm EDT
B3. Means Reduction Strategies for Suicide Prevention

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Overview

Reducing access to suicidal means is one of the most effective strategies for suicide prevention, though, many clinicians and universities are not fully aware of this strategy. Concrete means reduction strategies will be discussed, including methods for instituting systemic change and instituting campus-wide efforts with stakeholders. Personal successes and struggles from a public university will also be shared as examples. This session may be useful for providers, administrators, and those involved with student safety and welfare.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe the rationale for means reduction through examples of research and practice.
  2. Identify means reduction strategies and resources for training and implementation.
  3. Discuss tools for campus assessment and coalition building.
Presenter(s)

Brian Kassar, PsyD (Montana State University); Betsy Asserson, PhD (Montana State University)

Moderator

Faith DeNardo, PhD (Bowling Green State University)

Speakers

Brian Kassar, PsyD, Psychologist & Suicide Prevention Coordinator

Betsy Asserson, PhD, Psychologist/Director

Tue, Jun 8 at 3:00 pm EDT
B4. Fitting Their Schedules: Best Practices for Maximizing Efficiency at Mass Vaccination Clinics on College Campuses

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Overview

Mass vaccination and herd immunity are crucial in controlling the spread of infectious disease. Grounded in CDC best practices, over 11,300 people and 31% of the student population were vaccinated at University of Pennsylvania's 3-day, annual flu clinic in 2019. Positioning this clinic as a model for conducting a successful and efficient mass vaccination clinic, other universities can adapt clinic best practices to increase influenza vaccination rates and aid in COVID response efforts.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Professional Nursing Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe benefits of mass vaccination clinics.
  2. Identify important elements of an efficient mass vaccination clinic.
  3. List strategies for implementing efficient mass vaccination efforts on your campus.
Presenter(s)

Lauren Cordova, MSEd (University of Pennsylvania)

Moderator

Sheena Burgreen, MPS, BSN, RN, CHWP (University of North Alabama)

Speakers

Lauren Cordova, MSEd, Health Educator

Tue, Jun 8 at 3:00 pm EDT
B5. Connected College Health Network (CCHN)

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Overview

The Connected College Health Network is the ACHA data warehouse project whose goal is to bring together sources of information about college student health and healthcare to better inform college health professionals, institutions of higher education, and policy makers. Now in it's third year, the CCHN has successfully piloted collecting institutional health center data and linking it to institutional information from the Department of education, National College Health Assessment data, and clinical coding data. An overview of the project and initial reports will be presented.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe the data elements in the CCHN.
  2. Demonstrate how to utilize the CCHN to create benchmark reports.
  3. Discuss practical uses for CCHN generated reports for benchmarking and advocacy.
Presenter(s)

Sara Van Orman, MD, MMM (University of Southern California); Mary Hoban, PhD, MCHES (American College Health Association); Arushi Uppal (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Moderator


Speakers

Sarah Van Orman, Chief Health Officer and Vice Provost of Student Affairs

Mary Hoban, PhD, MCHES, Chief Research Officer

Arushi Uppal, FRONT- END CONSULTANT

Tue, Jun 8 at 3:00 pm EDT
B6. ACHA Racial Marginalization and Health Inequities Task Force Update

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Overview

ACHA's Racial Marginalization and Health Inequities Task force will share updates on the work that they have been doing over the past year. A review of the charge will be shared in addition to the myriad of steps that the task force has taken to identify the needs of the members of the association and the students we serve to be inclusive and decrease health inequities.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Ayers/Battle/Thomas Diversity Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe charge of ACHA Racial Marginalization and Health Inequities (RMHI) task force.
  2. Identify steps that the RMHI task force did to assess the marginalization of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) folx within ACHA.
  3. Identify steps that the RMHI task force utilized to assist with the assessment of campus needs.
  4. Name action steps that ACHA can take to increase inclusion within the association, and decrease health inequities amongst college students.
Presenter(s)

Raphael Coleman, PhD, MPH (Columbia University); Emily Matson, MPH, MCHES, CHWP (University of Minnesota); Sinead Younge, PhD (Morehouse College); and Cynthia Burwell, MS, EdD, MCHES (Norfolk State University); Padonda Webb, FNP (North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University) Joleen Nevers, MAEd, CHES, CSE, CSES (University of Connecticut)

Moderator

Alicia K. Czachowski, EdD, MPH, CHES (Tulane University)

Speakers

Raphael D. Coleman, PhD, MPH, Director, Alice! Health Promotion

Emily Matson, MPH, MCHES, CHWP, Instructor

Sinead Younge, PhD, Professor

Cynthia Burwell, MS, EdD, MCHES, Professor

Padonda Webb, FNP, Executive Director

Joleen Nevers, MAEd, CHES, CSE, CSES, Program Director for Regional Wellness

Tue, Jun 8 at 4:45 pm EDT
C1. Adaptive Strategic Planning: Using an Equity Lens to Create a Roadmap for the Future

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Overview

Strategic planning is an evolving art form that involves both aspirational and pragmatic thinking. If approached with an equity lens, the work will better address diverse student and staff needs. Whether you have a staff of 15 or 300, this session will share practical tools to involve leadership teams, staff, students, and external stakeholders. This workshop will also share internal assessment tools for those centers seeking a fresh internal view into their organization.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss how to apply an equity and inclusion lens to strategic planning.
  2. Describe engaging strategic planning activities.
  3. Compare internal organizational assessment approaches.
Presenter(s)

Bene Gatzert, MPA (University of California, Berkeley)

Moderator

Joel Schwartzkopf, MPAS, MBA, CHWP (Washington State University)

Speakers

Bene Gatzert, MPA, Chief Strategy Officer

Tue, Jun 8 at 4:45 pm EDT
C2. Mental Health, Burnout, and Wellness During COVID

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Overview

This presentation will focus on the mental health of campus health providers and staff with particular focus on the impact of burnout and trauma associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Wellness promotion at the individual and institutional level will also be discussed.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation UnitedHealthcare Student Resources Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Define burnout.
  2. Identify the impact of COVID-19 on provider wellness.
  3. Identify techniques for promoting wellness.
Presenter(s)

Bill Scheidler, MD (University of North Carolina)

Moderator

Jamie Shutter, MSEd (The University of Missouri)

Speakers

Bill Scheidler, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor

Tue, Jun 8 at 4:45 pm EDT
C3. Growth Through Change: Managing and Leading During Uncertain Times

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Overview

This session will address managing and leading through transition, uncertainty, and changes in leadership. Through roundtable discussions, participants will work through real life scenarios involving managing through changes in staffing and personnel, shift in strategic priorities, and limited resources; while upholding standards of practice and ensuring that work continues to be data and theory-driven, evidenced-based, and represents best practices. Participants will leave with tangible tools and skills to help them navigate the ever-changing landscape of higher education.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify tools or strategies that best fit for challenges resulting from change.
  2. Identify elements that challenge leading effectively during times of change.
  3. Describe how to create a management plan for effectively leading through.
Presenter(s)

Jennifer DiPrete, MEd, CWHC, and Courtney Deremiah, MS, MCHES (University of South Florida)

Moderator

Robert Dollinger, MD (Augusta University)

Speakers

Jennifer DiPrete, MEd, CWHC, Director, Center for Student Well-Being

Courtney Deremiah, MS, Associate Director, Center for Student Well-Being

Tue, Jun 8 at 4:45 pm EDT
C4. Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing of Students of Color: Cultivating a Culture of Care, Resiliency and Thriving

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Overview

A foundation of trust must be established first in order for students of color to reach out and/or accept services/resources that are there to support them on college campuses. The Equity in Mental Health Framework lays out specific recommendations to better support mental and emotional health of this population of students. This presentation focuses on a program we have implemented to build connection and trust with students of color, while decreasing stigma around seeking mental health support.

This session is sponsored by the American College Health Foundation Ayers/Battle/Thomas Diversity Fund.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe specific recommendations for colleges and universities in the Equity in Mental Health Framework.
  2. Discuss implementation of a program to meet mental health needs of students of color outside of traditional therapy.
  3. Describe how to develop an action plan for supporting and promoting the mental health of students of color on campus.
Presenter(s)

Kiera Walker, MA, ALC, NCC, April Coleman, MA, LPC, NCC, and Herbert Wilkerson, MS, LPC, JSOCC (University of Alabama at Birmingham)

Moderator

Marisol Ruiz Garcia, MSN, RN-BC (California State University Northridge)

Speakers

Kiera Walker, MA, ALC, NCC, Clinical Counselor

April Coleman, MA, LPC, NCC, Clinical Counselor/Outreach Coordinator

Herbert Wilkerson, MS, LPC, JSOCC, Clinical Counselor

Tue, Jun 8 at 4:45 pm EDT
C5. What's New in Allergy

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Overview

There have been a lot of novel therapies in the allergy/immunology space (FDA-approved peanut oral immunology, monoclonal antibodies for asthma, eczema, nasal polyps, etc). College health providers are coming across many of these new therapies/meds.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe the indication for allergy immunotherapy (AIT) and effects of AIT.
  2. Describe mechanism and different types of AIT.
  3. Describe safety considerations and management of adverse reactions.
Presenter(s)

S. Shahzad Mustafa, MD (Rochester Regional Health System)

Moderator

Pamela Stokes, MHCA, DNP, RN (Oklahoma State University)

Speakers

S. Shahzad Mustafa, MD, Clinical Assistant, Professor of Medicine

Tue, Jun 8 at 4:45 pm EDT
C6. Inclusive Programming Toolkit: How Student Organizations Can Be More Inclusive

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Overview

College students come to campus from all over the world with different backgrounds, identities, and experiences. Everyone has a role to play in creating an inclusive campus environment. This session will help participants look critically at their student organizations and discover ways to incorporate inclusive practices.

Learning Objectives
  1. Explain the importance of students finding belonging on campus.
  2. Identify how an inclusive programming toolkit can be used on their campus.
Presenter(s)

Carlie Deatherage, MPH, CHES (University of Central Oklahoma)

Moderator

Alyssa Petty, MS, CHES (Baylor University)

Speakers

Carlie Deatherage, MPH, CHES, Assistant Director, Health Promotion